Minissimo vs Nendoroid comparison

Minissimo vs Nendoroid comparison

I have a few Nendoroids by Goodsmile, and I really enjoy them. Sure, they aren’t perfect as they consist of so many small parts, but they’re adorable! Needless to say, when Di Molto Bene announced their new line of mini figures modeled after Nendoroid, I was excited.

The first Minissimo figure, Josuke Higashikata, has arrived! I decided to take the opportunity to compare him to one of my Nendos to determine if he’s worth the price or not, and whether Di Molto Bene really ripped all of Goodsmile’s ideas.

The Josuke Higashikata Minissimo was purchased via amiami, at the link provided. He’s still in stock as of this writing, which isn’t something that occurs often on that site. Usually when I purchase something from there, it goes out of stock soon after. Why is this little guy still available?

Minissimo and Nendoroid box fronts.
Minissimo and Nendoroid box fronts.

Well, first let’s look at the front of the boxes. Apologies for the way this picture turned out — I don’t have a proper studio for picture taking, unfortunately.

I had removed Josuke from his box and changed his face before deciding to write this post, so the face you see in this picture wasn’t his default one. That’s what’s shown on the print of the box itself.

Both boxes get the point across — the figure’s default form is on the front, blown up a bit from its actual size. They also both have the brand, the series’ logos, and the number of the figure. Josuke is the first of the line!

Back of Minissimo and Nendoroid boxes.
Back of Minissimo and Nendoroid boxes.

The back of the boxes are fairly similar, though Josuke’s is arguably a bit busier. On his, you see what he looks like from three different angles, as well as what his two extra face plates are. There’s a sticker of authenticity, as well as a few warnings and such. Standard stuff.

Eren’s box shows off a few of the poses he can change into, as well as the fact that a Mikasa Nendoroid exists. (You can also see that this particular Eren came from Crunchyroll’s store, but that’s not the case for all of them.)

The sides of the boxes both show more poses for the figures, so I don’t really need to show them off. Instead, I’ll go into what matters most: the contents inside.

Minissimo Josuke's contents.
Minissimo Josuke’s contents.

Josuke comes with:

  • a stand + stand arm (not pictured yet)
  • his body
  • his head and hair (which is pretty heavy)
  • three face plates
  • four bent arms
  • two straight arms
  • a hand with a comb
  • a closed fist
  • and a hand with a schoolbag.
Nendoroid Eren's contents
Nendoroid Eren’s contents

Eren comes with:

  • a stand + stand arm (not pictured yet)
  • his body
  • extra body with just a shirt
  • his head and hair
  • three face plates
  • 3D maneuver gear (or omnidirectional tool, whichever you’re used to)
  • air/wind effect
  • red wind effect for blades
  • two blades
  • interrogation pole
  • two bent arms
  • two arms for the interrogation pole
  • two bent legs
  • extra shoulder piece
  • extra neck joint

Phew! I think that’s “all” Eren comes with. I own Mikasa and Levi as well, and they all come with a lot of stuff. That being said, the fact that Josuke comes with so little isn’t a bad thing, necessarily. There are less pieces to keep track of for him, after all.

Weaker quality control
Weaker quality control

However, when I first took him out of the box last week, one of his legs fell right off. This has never happened to me with a Nendo, personally, so I was quite disappointed when this happened to Josuke. The leg won’t stay on unless he’s standing flat on the stand or on a table, so I’ll probably need to hot glue it back on at some point.

Josuke coming apart
Josuke coming apart

The good thing about Josuke is that everything comes apart easily, far more so than any of my Nendos. His hair and face plate popped off without any trouble, so I didn’t need to worry about scratching anything with my nails.

Minissimo face plate back
Minissimo face plate back

The back of Josuke’s face plate looks fairly similar to Eren’s, though it is a little shorter. The neck joint doesn’t stay in Josuke’s body, differing from Eren’s, which does.

Nendoroid face plate back
Nendoroid face plate back

As you can see, Eren’s face plate can ‘stand’ up on it’s own, since there’s no neck joint in it. Eren, to the right of the image, still has the neck joint in his body.

This, to me, makes more sense than what Di Molto Bene did with Josuke. To transfer the neck joint between face plates, you need to pop the plates together and pull the joint into the one you want. You can use your fingers to pull it out, but I found using the face plate I wanted him to wear a little easier.

Still, no matter what, the neck joint staying in the body is the easiest method. The fact that Josuke didn’t come with an extra makes transferring face plates even more of a hassle, since once it’s gone, it’s gone. Better not lose it!

This is awkward.
This is awkward.

As far as the figures go, as a whole, Josuke’s paint job looks very good. I’d say it’s comparable to Eren’s. You can see the seam in his hair where you pop it off, but it’s something that really doesn’t bother me at all.

Josuke seems to be a little bit taller than Eren, though some of that may be his beautiful pomp, haha.

Josuke can't believe what Eren's doing!
Josuke can’t believe what Eren’s doing!

The stands of the figures differ a bit. Josuke’s isn’t square, and doesn’t have pegs all over, leading to fewer choices on where to make him sit. Eren’s stand arm has more joints, also allowing for more freedom in posing than Josuke’s.

Minissimo and Nendoroid stands.
Minissimo and Nendoroid stands.

That being said, Josuke’s stand arm was much easier to insert into his back than Eren’s was. I have this problem with pretty much every Nendo I have — the holes are just a tiny, tiny bit too small! It’s a negligible complaint at the end of the day, though.

Finally, let me talk about their price points. Eren came out in 2014, but can still be purchased second hand for a very reasonable price. He retailed for about $40 USD, according to amiami. Josuke, however, is still available and retails for about $53 USD.

Yes, Josuke costs that much more. I guess it’s unfair to compare the prices of two figures that came out two years apart, so let’s check a more recent Nendo’s price.

Superman, a Nendoroid from October 2016, retails for about $45 USD and seems to come with a similar amount of parts as Josuke.

I’m not sure why Josuke costs so much. Would I recommend buying him? Yes, if he’s on sale for $40 or less. I think that’s a much better price point for him, and he is $42 at amiami now, but only because he’s been out for a month and they need to clear stock.

Anyway, I think Di Molto Bene has a good concept, though their product is very, very similar to Goodsmile’s. The changes they’ve made to differentiate from Nendoroids aren’t the best, with the neck joint not staying in the body being the strangest one I’ve seen. The paint job is great, though, so I do hope they continue the line, but maybe fine tune some things and either lower the price point or give the figures more accessories/parts to justify the cost.